Just a few turkeys left!

The last chance to order a Midget White Turkey from our farm is here!

Click over to HERE for more info or to order.

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Want to stock up on pasta for winter?

PASTA pre-orders are now closed. We will have plenty available at the market on 9/28!

We may be occasionally have fresh pasta and bread available over the winter. If you would like to be informed when we do, you can subscribe to our newsletter by clicking right here.
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Lambs and other signs of spring

Spring is definitely in full swing now. Lambs are bouncing around the pastures, green onions are finding their way into everything we eat, and we’re selling at markets.IMGP0105

Six lambs have been born – two sets of twins and two singles – within the past ten days. One last ewe, Zoe, who was our latest lamber last year too, is left to go.

Lambs are cute. It is undeniable. They don’t enjoy snuggling the way baby goats do, but I still give them lots of hugs. IMGP0129

The latest brood of baby chickens hatched this weekend. We have five mama hens with babies of various sizes running about. One more hen is sitting on eggs, and I think that will be the last we indulge this year. IMGP9812

Early May sent us too much rain. The garden was flooded in a few areas, but it seems that we only lost a few potato plants. When the sun came out, though, the whole garden started to grow. It feels like we’re behind in planting – being delayed by wet, wet soil, but tomatoes are in (the most important garden crop!), and I hope to plant other warm weather items this week…peppers, beans, stupid cucumbers.IMGP0035Even though much of the last few weeks was gray and dreary, I was rewarded with the delight of the locust flowers in bloom. Part of our field is covered with black locust trees, and the spring flowers are fragrant and delightful. I  love their light, sweet perfume as much as lilacs. One evening, I even saw an Oriole fluttering about the top of a locust tree, enjoying a meal of nectar.

For all its work and rain, Spring certainly has some beautiful surprises.
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April 23 – Sunday Update

Bill is in the kitchen making breakfast of farm-fresh eggs with some goat cheese we froze last summer, and a few stalks of asparagus that didn’t notice we tilled up their bed to make room for carrots.

The land is really starting to turn green in a significant way. We’ve been rotating the sheep and goats through a couple different pastures now that there is enough food to keep them busy for a few days. No lambs yet (soon??), but the three goat kids are growing strong.

The main garden is still a bit bare. There are wee cold-tolerant plants (kale, beets, broccoli, lettuce) in a few rows, and many succession plantings of radishes. I hope the first ones will be ready for our first market on May 5! Today I’ll be planting even more radishes and beets, as well as transplanting onions and leeks.

Most of the exciting stuff is currently contained in the greenhouse. Cabbages abound! We’ve been snacking on bok choi for a few weeks (it’s a healthy and yum addition to pizza, eggs, and stir fry, or a delicious side dish). We even have our very first tomato buds! There are only four tomato plants potted in the greenhouse, but as addicts, we’ll take whatever tomatoes we can get!

Finally, all our early potato varieties have been planted – about 150 pounds of seed! We’ve put in some old favorites like Red Norland, and are testing some new varieties as well.

 

Photos from the Raspberry patch

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We planted a few Bristol Black raspberry bushes 4 or 5 years ago, and they have thrived. There is now a large tangle of vines and every year around the Summer Solstice (except the drought year…), we pick oodles of berries for fresh eating, jam, and pie. A bunch make it into our freezer for waffles in February.

Our first major harvest was this week and we’ll have lots of half-pints available at the market. I discovered a catbird nest among the thorns. It seems a very prudent spot for raising babies with lots of food near by. It is also mostly undisturbed, except for the occasional human hand and interloping goat who loves raspberry leaves and has no respect for fences.

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Time to make the bread…

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The Market isn’t until Saturday, but the bread making begins on Thursday. To get the light, fluffy texture in the baguettes and the best flavor, the dough spends a lot of time developing. Bill makes a small amount of dough on Thursday, which is called the “preferment.” On Friday morning, more flour is added, then I do lots of stretching and folding throughout the day to help chewy gluten develop. In the evening, Bill has a complicated choreography of shaping, resting, and reshaping before the bread is cooked. The dance continues during cooking with precise timing and the addition of steam, to help create the perfect crust.

We think all the work and attention makes a fantastic baguette! Repeat customers seemed to agree, with multiple bread-lovers saying the devoured an entire baguette in one sitting. (No judgment here! We do it all the time!) Baguettes will be available at the Zionsville Farmers’ Market this week!

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Flighty Amelia, who lays blue eggs

This is Amelia – named for her early interest in flying over obstacles that the other chicks would walk around. Amelia, and her puffy-cheeked daughters, lay blue eggs. She was bred from Araucanas and Ameraucanas – two breeds of chicken that originated in South America. Amelia passes on her blue eggs and feathered faces to her chicks, but, so far, feather color seems to be dominated by our white Wyandotte roosters. We all hope you enjoy the uniquely colored eggs!

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